A Map of the Most Googled ‘Distinct’ Thanksgiving Recipes Broken Down by State

The New York Times has a map of the United States detailing the most “distinct” Thanksgiving recipes Googled by each state. The results were compiled by Google, tossing out obvious choices like turkey and stuffing, instead focusing on unique foodstuffs, such as “frog eye salad” in the Rocky Mountain States and the “pig pickin cake” of North Carolina. The map was created in part due to fallout from a recent Thanksgiving map designed by the paper to reflect “recipes that evoke each of the 50 states.”

image via The New York Times

Recipe of the Week: Mojo Turkey

Florida’s cuisine ranges from the deep Southern cooking of the humid, citrus-scented central and northern parts of the state to the more Caribbean-inflected cuisine of the marshy lowlands of Miami and the Keys. Here, the turkey nods to what happened when Cuban culture drifted onto the Thanksgiving tables of South Florida, with a bird dressed in a marinade of sour oranges (a mixture of orange and lime juice works as well) mixed with a lot of garlic and oregano. Serve the bird with black beans and white rice on the side — and a Key lime pie for dessert.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 12- to -14- pound turkey, giblets and neck removed
  • 2 heads of garlic, peeled and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons ground cumin
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 2 tablespoons black pepper, plus more to taste
  • 2 cups sour orange juice, or 1 cup fresh orange juice and 1 cup fresh lime juice
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • ¼ cup fresh oregano leaves, roughly chopped
  • 1 orange, cut into quarters
  • 1 lime, cut into quarters
  • 1 small yellow onion, peeled and cut into quarters

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Rinse turkey well in cold water and pat very dry with paper towels.
  2. Make the marinade: Combine garlic, cumin, salt and pepper in a large mixing bowl and mash the mixture together with the back of a kitchen spoon to make a kind of paste. Stir sour orange juice (or orange and lime juices) and oil into the paste and whisk to combine. Add oregano leaves and mix again. Reserve 1/2 cup of marinade and put aside.
  3. Put turkey in a roasting pan that can fit in the refrigerator and cover with remaining marinade, making sure to get a lot of it into the turkey’s open cavity. Cover and refrigerate overnight, or for at least a few hours. Baste a few times with marinade.
  4. When ready to cook, heat oven to 450 degrees. Remove turkey from marinade and place on a clean cutting board. Discard marinade and clean roasting pan well. Return turkey to roasting pan, tuck the tips of the wings under the bird and shower it with salt and pepper. Place orange, lime and onion quarters in the turkey’s cavity, then truss its legs together with cotton string. Roast turkey, uncovered, in the oven for 30 minutes.
  5. Reduce oven heat to 325 degrees. Baste turkey with pan juices, and add remaining marinade to the pan. Continue roasting turkey, basting every 30 minutes and tenting it with foil if the skin is turning too dark, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh without touching bone registers 165 degrees, approximately 2 hours 45 minutes to 3 hours more. Transfer to a cutting board or platter and allow to rest at least 30 minutes before carving.

What the First Thanksgiving Meal Probably Looked Like in 1621

A traditional Thanksgiving dinner usually consists of (at the very least) a turkey with stuffing, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie, however, as Guardian Food points out, the very first Thanksgiving feast in 1621 looked a lot different.

The only written account says that they ate five deer and some birds, probably a swan or a duck. Wild turkeys were harder to hunt down, but shellfish were easy to find, so they probably made it into the feast. …Cranberries were around, but sugar wasn’t. …As for potatoes, they were mostly still in South America. Stuffing made kind of an appearance, but it was pretty basic.

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10 HEALTH BENEFITS OF BACON!

Almost everyone loves bacon. It’s ridiculously awesome. And many people have very mixed views about whether bacon is actually good or bad for you. It’s not defined as completely healthy, but does have some amazing health benefits if you have it just about once a week.

HERE ARE THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF BACON:

  1. It’s packed with protein that helps regulate your energy level’s. And keep you feeling full. Plus protein in general boost’s your Norepinephrine, Epinephrine and Dopamine levels. Which will lead you to feel happy and energetic. No wonder it’s so addictive.
  2. Helps to lower your blood pressure as well as your blood sugar.
  3. Can help ease the symptom’s that come along with Diabetes.
  4. Helps to prevent Stroke’s, Heart Disease and Heart Attacks.
  5. Contains Choline that improves your memory and IQ. It also help’s reduce the symptoms that come with Alzheimer’s Disease.
  6. Can help you feel happy and reduce your stress levels.
  7. Contains high amount’s of: Iron, Magnesium, Zinc, Phosphorus, Protein, Niacin, Vitamins B12, B6 and Thiamine.
  8. Contains Omega 3 Fatty Acids which help reduce inflammation throughout the body.
  9. Is used as a treatment for Salt Depletion (Hyponatremia).
  10. Helps prevent Anemia.

So don’t believe the hype that bacon is the worst thing you could possibly ingest, and go out and grab yourself a handful of salty, pork goodness!

Recipe of the Week: Twice Baked Chicken Pot Pie Potatoes with Crispy Bacon

Ingredients:

  • 4 russet potatoes
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cups rotisserie chicken, chopped
  • 1/2 cup celery, chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, chopped
  • 1/2 yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 1/2 cups mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • 1/2 cup bacon, cooked, chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Spray a baking sheet with non-stick cooking spray. Take a fork and poke a couple of holes around each potato. Place the potatoes on the baking sheet. Drizzle tops with 1 tablespoon olive oil, s&p. Bake for about 50 minutes or until soften. Remove from oven to cool.
  3. Meanwhile, in a medium skillet preheated to medium-high heat, add the remaining olive oil, celery, carrots, onion, thyme, and s&p. Saute veggies until softened about 7 minutes. Turn the heat back to medium, add butter to skillet and melt. Sprinkle the flour over the veggies and stir to combine. Next, pour the milk over the veggies and continue to stir creating a thickened sauce about 2 to 3 minutes. Remove skillet from heat, stir in chicken, 1/2 cup mozzarella, & a dash of s&p.
  4. Once the potatoes have cooled, slice the tops open lengthwise and scoop out some of the potato. Pour some of the chicken pot pie mixture into the baked potato. Top the potatoes with 1/4 cup of the mozzarella. Place baking sheet back in the oven for five minutes or until the cheese has melted. Remove from oven, garnish with bacon, and serve immediately!